Saskatchewan to introduce new police across province: throne speech

As part of Wednesday’s Throne Speech, Scott Moe and the provincial government are introducing more police to the province.

“The recent shocking and tragic events at James Smith Cree Nation and the Village of Weldon underscore that more needs to be done to protect Saskatchewan people,” the throne speech read.

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The speech outlined the creation of the new Saskatchewan Marshalls Service, which will work with RCMP to enhance law enforcement throughout the province and provide emergency and specialized support to other law enforcement organizations when requested.

“This isn’t looking to replace any of the law enforcement entities that are out there,” Saskatchewan premier Scott Moe said. “It is about augmenting and enhancing their work because we feel we need to have a higher degree of providing public safety in our communities.

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The service will be based out of Prince Albert and is a force meant to support the work done by other crime teams in the province.

“Wherever there are hotspots and we need a stronger presence, they will arrive in those areas,” Moe said. “They will help where it is needed.”

Moe said the provinces Warrant Enforcement and Suppression Team has been successful since its introduction six months ago, “but there are still too many criminals with outstanding warrants at large in our province.”

As a result, the government will be adding eight new officers to the team in Prince Albert as well as adding a new Crime Reduction Team in North Battleford.

“The recent tragedies in our province have also exposed weaknesses in the warrant enforcement process that must be addressed immediately,” the speech read. “My government will work with the Correctional Service of Canada to improve information sharing and enhance enforcement activities.”

After the mass stabbings that took place on James Smith Cree Nation on Sept. 4, more discussions are taking place surrounding First Nations policing.

Moe said these discussions will continue to increase throughout the following months.

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“My government is now consulting on ways to develop responsive, community-based policing models that meet the needs of First Nations communities. This includes discussions with the Prince Albert Grand Council and the federal government on how a self-administered First Nations police service could be created.”

The speech also outlined the government’s stance on the federal governments national freeze on handguns and the gun buyback program.

“Many Saskatchewan residents see the federal government as too lenient on violent offenders who commit gun crimes and too focused on punishing law-abiding gun owners,” the speech said.

“This session, my government will take significant action to crack down on the illegal and violent use of firearms in the commission of crimes to ensure families feel safe in their communities. We will do this while also defending the rights of lawful and responsible firearms owners.”

Click to play video: 'Regina police release a community crime map'

Regina police release a community crime map

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