Need COVID-19 test for Oilers game or live concert? Here’s what it will cost

We are one month away from when Oilers fans will be once again allowed to enter Rogers Place.

Aside from admission, anyone who’s not fully vaccinated will need to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test within 48 hours to enter.

Read more: Alberta shifting away from wide asymptomatic testing as province confirms another 146 cases of COVID-19

It’s something you’ll have to get from a pharmacy or a private lab and it doesn’t come cheap.

“The antigen and antibody tests are $75 plus GST and then the PCR test — if you are travelling to another country — is $175,” said Gen Moen, a Registered Pharmacy Technician at The Medicine Shoppe.

DynaLIFE charges $150 for its PCR test.

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It can take up to 48 hours for a result. The Medicine Shoppe offers a rush option but it’s double the cost.

Click to play video: 'OEG says Edmonton Oilers fans need to get vaccinated or test negative for COVID-19' OEG says Edmonton Oilers fans need to get vaccinated or test negative for COVID-19

OEG says Edmonton Oilers fans need to get vaccinated or test negative for COVID-19

The Oilers Entertainment Group hasn’t yet specified which test it will accept. It said the team is evaluating the best options for fans and that details will come before the season starts.

Read more: Fans attending Oilers games at Rogers Place must provide proof of vaccination or negative COVID-19 test

At $75, the antigen test might be the test of choice for events like concerts or hockey games.

“It’s more cost efficient and you get results right away within an hour just emailed to your phone,” Moen said.

Moen said the pharmacy is already busy testing, and expects these changes will greatly boost demand.

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Click to play video: 'Alberta government resisting vaccine passport system even as businesses demand it' Alberta government resisting vaccine passport system even as businesses demand it

Alberta government resisting vaccine passport system even as businesses demand it

Health law and policy professor Lorian Hardcastle said these requirements could also push up vaccine rates.

“If there are merely vaccine hesitant and not opposed, I think many people would opt for the vaccine over the expensive and inconvenient testing.”

Hardcastle said with sports organizations and live event groups not wanting to be associated with outbreaks, Alberta could see more rules in place.

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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